Stories on art, design, conservation, and more shed light on the Guggenheim’s past, present, and future.

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Speed, Space, and Satire—Italian Futurism on the Blog

Detail: Carlo Carrà, Interventionist Demonstration(Manifestazione Interventista), 1914. Tempera, pen, mica powder, and paper glued on cardboard, 38.5 × 30 cm. Gianni Mattioli Collection, on long-term loan to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome
Detail: Carlo Carrà, Interventionist Demonstration (Manifestazione Interventista), 1914. Tempera, pen, mica powder, and paper glued on cardboard, 38.5 × 30 cm. Gianni Mattioli Collection, on long-term loan to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome

As we near the close of the Guggenheim's Italian Futurism exhibition, we revisit an array of blog posts that explored works in diverse mediums and provided a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the making of this unparalleled retrospective. Read through our Futurism series and get a chance to win a Futurism prize pack plus two admission passes to see the exhibition. More

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Futurism's Riots

Detail: Umberto Boccioni, Riot in the Galleria (Rissa in Galleria), 1910. Oil on canvas, 76 x 64 cm. Pinocoteca di Brera, Milan. Photo: Soprintendenza per i Beni Storici Artistici ed Etnoantropologici di Milano su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo/Laboratorio fotografico
Detail: Umberto Boccioni, Riot in the Galleria (Rissa in Galleria), 1910. Oil on canvas, 76 x 64 cm. Pinocoteca di Brera, Milan. Photo: Soprintendenza per i Beni Storici Artistici ed Etnoantropologici di Milano su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo/Laboratorio fotografico

Umberto Boccioni’s 1910 Riot in the Galleria, which joined the Guggenheim's Italian Futurism exhibition in May, epitomizes contemporary city life—a favorite theme of Futurism—using a 19th-century style of painting. More

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The Guggenheim’s Architectonic Futurisms

Detail: Angiolo Mazzoni, boiler house, control cabin, and personnel facilities at Florence’s Santa Maria Novella railway station (1927–34). Historical photograph. MART, Museo di arte moderna e contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto, Italy © Archivio Storico - istituto Luce Cinecittà. Photo: © MART, Archivio del ’900
Detail: Angiolo Mazzoni, boiler house, control cabin, and personnel facilities at Florence’s Santa Maria Novella railway station (1927–34). Historical photograph. MART, Museo di arte moderna e contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto, Italy © Archivio Storico - istituto Luce Cinecittà. Photo: © MART, Archivio del ’900

Along with Antonio Sant’Elia, known for his significant architectural drawings, the author considers the work of architect Angiolo Mazzoni, and explores the connections between the two Futurists. More

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How the Guggenheim Installed James Turrell’s Aten Reign

Video still: How the Guggenheim Installed Aten Reign, Matt Stanton Productions and Amy Koshbin © 2013 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York
Video still: How the Guggenheim Installed Aten Reign, Matt Stanton Productions and Amy Koshbin © 2013 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Among the remarkable aspects of James Turrell's installation last year at the Guggenheim was the impression of weightlessness it created. In this video, the museum's Chief Fabricator explains how the piece's underlying structure was built. More

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Kandinsky's Early Representational Woodcuts

Singer
Vasily Kandinsky, Singer (Sängerin), 1903. Woodcut on Japanese paper, mounted on paper, image: 20 × 14.6 cm; sheet: 27 × 19.1 cm; mount: 35.9 × 24.8 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 72.2003 © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Before he created his first fully abstract paintings, Vasily Kandinsky made these spare, representational woodcuts, which reduce compositions and narratives to simplified, expressionistic forms. More