Stories on art, design, conservation, and more shed light on the Guggenheim’s past, present, and future.

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Discover Three Artists Participating in "Carrie Mae Weems LIVE"

Lyle Ashton Harris, Americas, 1987–88 (printed 2007)
Lyle Ashton Harris, Americas, 1987–88 (printed 2007). Gelatin silver prints, sheet: 101.6 × 76.2 cm each; image: 76 × 50.5 cm each, AP 1/2, edition of 10. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee 2011.57 © Lyle Ashton Harris

Carrie Mae Weems's hand-picked line-up for next weekend's event at the Guggenheim includes three fellow photographers also represented in the museum’s permanent collection: Lyle Ashton Harris, Leslie Hewitt, and Xaviera Simmons. More

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Dream Work and the Mimesis of Carrie Mae Weems

Carrie Mae Weems, In the Mountains of Santiago de Cuba (from Dreaming in Cuba), 2002
Detail: Carrie Mae Weems, In the Mountains of Santiago de Cuba (from Dreaming in Cuba), 2002. Gelatin silver print, 78.7 x 78.7 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York © Carrie Mae Weems

In Carrie Mae Weems’s work, the dream is the image: nothing is ordinary—and nothing can be assumed. More

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Cosmopolitan and Colonialist—The Multiple Meanings of Fortunato Depero’s Advertisements

Detail: Fortunato Depero, The Stoplights of the Future Bitter and Cordial Campari (I fari dell’avvenire Bitter e Cordial Campari), 1931. India ink on card, 56 × 41.5 cm. Archivio Galleria Campari, Milan © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. Photo: STUDIO F 38 F, Milan
Detail: Fortunato Depero, The Stoplights of the Future Bitter and Cordial Campari (I fari dell’avvenire Bitter e Cordial Campari), 1931. India ink on card, 56 × 41.5 cm. Archivio Galleria Campari, Milan © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. Photo: STUDIO F 38 F, Milan

Fortunato Depero, one of the Futurist movement's most innovative graphic designers, created startling and unique advertisements—some with a colonialist bent. More

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How Can Museums Reach Multilingual Audiences?

No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia
Installation view: No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 22–May 22, 2013. Peter Snyder © 2013 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Sharing resources with audiences who speak a range of languages is a challenge for today's institutions. Next week, we'll be co-facilitating a discussion about it on Twitter—join us! More