Findings

A Startling Lichtenstein-Inspired Spine

Pop Art… and after

Amaya, M. (1966). Pop Art… and after. New York, NY: Viking Press. N6490 .A62 1966.

Pop Art… and after

Amaya, M. (1966). Pop Art… and after. New York, NY: Viking Press. N6490 .A62 1966.

The image of the gun on the spine of Pop Art… and after comes from a 1964 Roy Lichtenstein–designed felt banner titled Pistol, produced, amusingly enough, by the Betsy Ross American Flag and Banner Company. It caught my eye while I was strolling through the library, providing a cheeky exception to a usually peaceful experience. Written by Mario Amaya in 1965, the book covers mostly American and British Pop art from the two to four previous years, and is just one example from the deluge of contemporary reactions to the movement. According to Amaya, in its early stages Pop art prompted a flood of coverage unparalleled in its immediacy, fitting for “an instant art form, for an instant society,” another demonstration of how it presaged so much of our own current fast-paced media landscape.