Findings

Verve Magazine: Publisher of Picasso, Kandinsky, Joyce, and Camus

Verve 5

Tériade, E. Verve 5, no. 19–20 (1948), Picasso cover page. Call number: RB SER V vol. 5, no. 19–20

Verve 7

Tériade, E. Verve 7, no. 27–28 (1952), Chagall inside pages. Call number: RB SER V vol. 7, no. 27–28

Verve 7

Tériade, E. Verve 7, no. 27–28 (1952), Braque cover page. Call number: RB SER V vol. 7, no. 27–28

Verve 4

Tériade, E. Verve 4, no. 13 (1945), Matisse inside page. Call number: RB SER V vol. 4, no. 13

Verve 7

Tériade, E. Verve 7, no. 25–26 (1951), Picasso cover page. Call number: RB SER V vol. 7, no. 25–26

In 1937, publisher Tériade launched an art magazine titled Verve, which focused on bringing the ideas and techniques of French modern art to a new generation of painters and intellectuals. Tériade’s background in art publications went back to his collaborations with Christian Zervos when they worked on Cahiers D’art and Minotaure.

What set Verve apart from Tériade’s previous publications are the high-quality color reproductions of artworks through lithographs. Tériade chose to format Verve for a larger audience; he appealed to the inner circle of modern art followers while making artworks more accessible by including multiple reproductions. This idea of art for the elite versus art for the masses is represented throughout all of the issues.

The magazine was published in both English and French with covers and illustrations by influential artists like Georges Braque, Marc Chagall, Vasily Kandinsky, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso, with accompanied text written by Albert Camus, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Andre Malraux, and Jean-Paul Sartre, to name a few. The magazine ran from 1937–1960 with 38 issues.